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Autor Thema: 5E von WotC angekündigt  (Gelesen 42528 mal)

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Windjammer

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5E von WotC angekündigt
« am: 09. Januar 2012, 14:45:52 »
Nachzulesen hier:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/10/arts/video-games/dungeons-dragons-remake-uses-players-input.html?_r=1

Der Count-Down laeuft bereits auf Enworld. Naeheres folgt in Kuerze.

"True believers have lost faith. Factions squabble. The enemies are not only massed at the gates of the kingdom, but they have also broken through.

This may sound like the back story for an epic trilogy. Instead, it’s the situation faced by the makers of Dungeons & Dragons, the venerable fantasy role-playing game many consider to be the grandfather of the video game industry. Gamers bicker over Dungeons & Dragons rules. Some have left childhood pursuits behind. And others have spurned an old-fashioned, tabletop fantasy role-playing game for shiny electronic competitors like World of Warcraft and the Elder Scrolls.

But there might yet be hope for Dungeons & Dragons, known as D&D. On Monday, Wizards of the Coast, the Hasbro subsidiary that owns the game, is expected to announce that a new edition is under development, the first overhaul of the rules since the contentious fourth edition was released in 2008. And Dungeons & Dragons’ designers are also planning to undertake an exceedingly rare effort for the gaming industry over the next few months: asking hundreds of thousands of fans to tell them how exactly they should reboot the franchise.

The game “is a unique entertainment experience because it’s crafted by the players at the table, and every gaming session is different,” said Liz Schuh, who directs publishing and licensing for Dungeons & Dragons. “We want to take that idea of the players crafting that experience to the next level and say: ‘Help us craft the rules. Help us craft how this game is played.’ ”

Dungeons & Dragons, created by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, was the first commercially published role-playing game when it came out in 1974. In the game imagination is the playscape, assisted by graph-paper maps, miniature figurines of orcs and hobbits and a referee called a “dungeon master” who moderates an improvised story with a pretend fellowship of wizards, warriors and rogues.Players toss polyhedral dice and consult tomes of rules to determine outcomes. It has shades of the “Lord of the Rings” movies, except that in the game players assembled around a table get to be the characters.

“There is something fundamental to the D&D role-playing game that answers a need for people,” said Mike Mearls, senior manager of Dungeons & Dragons research and development — that need being telling your own heroic story. Throughout the 1970s and ’80s Dungeons & Dragons grew from a cult sensation into something more, surviving, even thriving, after unfounded accusations that it led teenagers to practice black magic and commit suicide. Since the game’s birth an estimated 20 million people have played it and spent $1 billion on its products. Many computer coders once dabbled in the hobby, which explains why so many video games today use a “run through a dungeon and kill monsters” premise, and borrow concepts — avatars, levels, open-ended stories, cooperative game play — pioneered by Dungeons & Dragons. The nerdy pastime has even become a badge of honor for hipsters and artists, with the likes of the film director Jon Favreau, the comedian Stephen Colbert, the N.B.A. star Tim Duncan and the actor Vin Diesel professing their love of the game, and the NBC comedy “Community” using it as a plot point in a recent episode.

But Dungeons & Dragons has slumped, buffeted by forces external and internal. The company does not release sales figures, but analysts and gaming experts agree that sales of the game, and all tabletop role-playing ones, have been dwindling for years. Ryan Scott Dancey, chief executive of the game company Goblinworks and a former vice president at Wizards of the Coast, said the overall market peaked between 1999 and 2003 and has been in steady decline since 2005. “My instincts are it’s slower than ever,” he said.

Electronic games have done the most damage, as entries like World of Warcraft and the currently hot-selling Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim let players (represented by tricked-out avatars) conquer acres of fantastically rendered digital landscapes without the need for hours of time spent writing the story line and sketching Middle Earth-like maps.

“If all you’re looking for is fulfillment of your wish to be an idealized projection of yourself who gains in wealth and power by overcoming monsters, there are lots of ways to do that nowadays,” said Tavis Allison, a game designer in New York who has made his own role-playing game, Adventurer Conqueror King. “In the ’70s Dungeons & Dragons was the only game in town.”

Edition wars have also wounded the game. Various rules systems have been released over Dungeons & Dragons’ 38-year history: Basic, Advanced, Advanced 2nd edition, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0. Devotion to particular rules can be fanatical. Hostilities about how to best play the game — for example, how a sorcerer casts spells — flare up among the core fan base.

A result, said David M. Ewalt, a senior editor at Forbes and the author of a forthcoming history of Dungeons & Dragons, has been a fractured fan base. The game is a group activity, he said, and playing together is tricky when players use different rules. “Imagine trying to organize a basketball team, if the point guard adheres to modern league rules, but the center only knows how to play ancient Mayan handball.”

Teil 2:

"When the N.B.A. adopted the 3-point shot in 1979, purists cried foul at rules changes, just as many D&D devotees dismissed the rules of the game’s fourth edition as dumbed down, overeager to mimic multiplayer online games like Warcraft — and favoring killing over the role-playing and storytelling roots of Dungeons & Dragons. Some began playing other role-playing games like Pathfinder, which won over disgruntled players. Miniature war games like Warhammer or Wizards of the Coast’s own trading-card game Magic: The Gathering have also diluted Dungeons & Dragons’ dominance.
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With the new edition and the call for feedback, in a “hearts and minds” campaign, Wizards of the Coast is attempting to rally players to the cause . The strategy centers on asking them what they’d like to see in a new version and giving everyday gaming groups the chance to test new rules. “We’re really lucky that we have such passionate fans,” Ms. Schuh said, “and we anticipate they’ll roll up their sleeves and help us in this effort.”

Greg Tito, games editor for The Escapist, an online games culture magazine, will be one of them. “The long open testing period for the next edition, if handled correctly, could be exactly what’s needed to make players feels invested in D&D again,” he said.

The rule changes are part of several efforts to keep the brand relevant. Wizards of the Coast already publishes a steady stream of products set in the D&D universe: fantasy novels (by authors like R. A. Salvatore), comic books and board games. To combat the perception that the game requires hours of planning, the company organizes weekly drop-in sessions called D&D Encounters, run in game shops nationwide; they’re billed as an easy way “to fit your game in after school or work.”

Wizards of the Coast has also made previous forays into the digital realm. Dungeons & Dragons Online was released in 2006. Since becoming free to play, the game has gained over one million new players, an impressive figure for D&D but relatively insignificant compared to World of Warcraft’s 10-million-plus paid subscribers. A Facebook game called Dungeons & Dragons: Heroes of Neverwinter made its debut this fall. Also, a “virtual tabletop” product to allow Dungeons & Dragons acolytes to play online is being Beta-tested.

Still, a new edition could backfire, if the changes requested by hard-core fans can’t be reconciled or if players believe the company is merely paying lip service to their concerns. Nonetheless the company remains “absolutely committed” to the core tabletop game-play, Ms. Schuh said. “People want that face-to-face experience.”

Certainly committed players will remind you that tabletop role-playing games still outperform computer games in one key arena: improvisation. Video games have limits. Some dungeon doors can’t be opened because a programmer didn’t code them to open. Dungeons & Dragons remains a game where anything can happen.

So while Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 and Portal 2 may have their day in the sun, “they can’t compete with a live Dungeon Master for throwing thrills at the players,” James W. Ward, a game designer and former vice president of TSR Inc., the company that originally published D&D, wrote in an e-mail. “The fun of growing a character while your friends do the same thing around a table munching on M&M’s and other snacks is difficult to duplicate.”

Even if players increasingly bring their iPads, loaded with Dungeons & Dragons rulebooks, to the gaming table. "
A blind man may be very pitturesque; but it takes two eyes to see the picture. - Chesterton

Zechi

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[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #1 am: 09. Januar 2012, 15:06:03 »
Interessant, damit hätte ich noch nicht gerechnet. Mal sehen, was WotC da auf die Beine stellt. Ich bin echt gespannt.
Planen ist alles, Pläne sind nichts.

Zechi

  • Globaler Moderator
[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #2 am: 09. Januar 2012, 15:17:32 »
Planen ist alles, Pläne sind nichts.

Joni

  • Mitglied
[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #3 am: 09. Januar 2012, 15:47:48 »
Wir haben schon einen Liveticker auf unserem Blog eingerichtet :-).

http://www.herzliches-rollenspiel.de/blog/?p=3214

Grüßle, Joni

Zechi

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[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #4 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:27:08 »
Das 5E Design-Team (Quelle EN-World):

Zitat
Mike Mearls, Team Lead
Greg Bilsland, Team Producer
Monte Cook, Design Team Lead
Bruce Cordell, Designer
Robert J. Schwalb, Designer
Jeremy Crawford, Development Team Lead
Tom LaPille, Developer
Rodney Thompson, Developer
Miranda Horner, Editor
« Letzte Änderung: 09. Januar 2012, 16:31:06 von Zechi »
Planen ist alles, Pläne sind nichts.

Zechi

  • Globaler Moderator
[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #5 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:29:58 »
Zu den FR (Quelle EN-World):

Zitat
The Forgotten Realms will be supported from the start, and a video game art studio from China has been hired to fully detail the Realms. I asked if going forward support would be continued for the current time after the Spellplague and the Neverwinter Campaign. A WotC spokesperson answered, "The Forgotten Realms has a rich history and we will support all of it. It is for the gamers to decide which time they would enjoy playing in." That would allow Wizards to take advantage of a massive back catalog of products; however, there are no current plans that we know of for other settings - we assume these will follow in later years.
Planen ist alles, Pläne sind nichts.

Xiam

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #6 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:43:29 »
Ehre wem Ehre gebührt. Windjammer hatte es zuerst entdeckt, daher am besten da weiter diskutieren. Vielleicht kann einer der Mods den Thread hier dann einfach schließen, damit die Diskussion nicht an zwei Stellen geführt wird.








Wieso wird das hier denn noch nicht diskutiert?

Das Besondere: Die Spieler sollen stärker in den Designprozess eingebunden werden.

Artikel in NY-Times
« Letzte Änderung: 09. Januar 2012, 16:59:57 von Xiam »
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Wasum

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #7 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:44:40 »
Zumal der Titel deutlich besser ist....

Xiam

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #8 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:48:04 »
Speziell für Zechi, der ja immer gebetsmühlenartig predigt, dass man ja gar keine Zahlen hätte, um den Niedergang von D&D zu beziffern:

Zitat von: NY-Times
The company does not release sales figures, but analysts and gaming experts agree that sales of the game, and all tabletop role-playing ones, have been dwindling for years. Ryan Scott Dancey, chief executive of the game company Goblinworks and a former vice president at Wizards of the Coast, said the overall market peaked between 1999 and 2003 and has been in steady decline since 2005. “My instincts are it’s slower than ever,” he said.

Konnt's mir nicht verkneifen :D

Sieht fast so aus, als hätte Archoangel mit seinem "Gefühl" drüben im anderen Thread gar nicht so unrecht.
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Judas Dukat

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #9 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:50:49 »
Wird doch schon... hier ;)

Wobei dein Titel wirklich besser ist :)
"Gesunder Menschenverstand: eigentlich nur eine Anhäufung von Vorurteilen, die man bis zum 18. Lebensjahr erworben hat."

Xiam

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #10 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:54:53 »
Das ist ja merkwürdig... ich lese immer über "Alle ungelesenen Themen" und da wird mir der Thread nicht angezeigt...  :blink:

Na gut, dann drüben.
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Xiam

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[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #11 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:56:14 »
Speziell für Zechi, der ja immer gebetsmühlenartig predigt, dass man ja gar keine Zahlen hätte, um den Niedergang von D&D zu beziffern:

Zitat von: NY-Times
The company does not release sales figures, but analysts and gaming experts agree that sales of the game, and all tabletop role-playing ones, have been dwindling for years. Ryan Scott Dancey, chief executive of the game company Goblinworks and a former vice president at Wizards of the Coast, said the overall market peaked between 1999 and 2003 and has been in steady decline since 2005. “My instincts are it’s slower than ever,” he said.

Konnt's mir nicht verkneifen :D

Sieht fast so aus, als hätte Archoangel mit seinem "Gefühl" drüben im anderen Thread gar nicht so unrecht.
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Xiam

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D&D 5E
« Antwort #12 am: 09. Januar 2012, 16:59:12 »
Ah, deswegen, ich habe das News-Forum auf Ignore, weil da immer so viel unnützer Müll angekündigt wird ;-)
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Xiam

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[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #13 am: 09. Januar 2012, 17:04:24 »
Interessant, damit hätte ich noch nicht gerechnet. Mal sehen, was WotC da auf die Beine stellt. Ich bin echt gespannt.
Die Ankündigung der Wizards klingt übrigens für mich fast ein bisschen so, als hätten die das eigentlich noch gar nicht ankündigen wollen, sondern erst im Frühjahr.

"Wie ihr ja schon bei der New York Times lesen konntet *knirsch knirsch*..."

Vielleicht ist es geleaked worden.
1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Joni

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[Keine Verarsche] Die 5. Edition kommt - Ankuendigung der New York Times
« Antwort #14 am: 09. Januar 2012, 17:15:20 »
Das war zu gut vorbereitet, um "geleaked" zu sein, würde ich mal sagen.

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